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dublin institute of technology,
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ireland.

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Solar Energy:

autonomous lighting systems for buildings

The research project is developing and validating a generic model for combined daylight and Photovoltaic powered lighting systems and employing this model to undertake technical and economic optimisation.
New components will be added to commercial software (TRNSYS) in order to extend its capacity to electric lighting and interconnection of building integrated distributed generation systems.
The major focus of this study is PV powered artificial sources. There is a minor interest in daylight and non-PV powered artificial sources, primarily for reference/benchmarking purposes.

Software simulation

An existing software simulation programme (TRNSYS) will be built upon. The new programme will enable the user to place sources of light on any wall, and on the ceiling. These light sources will be of regular shape and of variable dimensions. The user will be able to define the spectral characteristic and the luminance of each light source. The Maxwellian Trichromacy matrix will serve as the input. The user will enter a single value Utilisation Factor, and a Maintenance Factor for each source. The user will also enter the dimensions of internal sub-spaces; work desks, etc. The simulation will be limited to regular three-dimensional internal spaces. The programme will generate an image of the resultant illuminance levels of the room.

Hardware aspects

Types of light sources include:

  • Daylight: windows, Light-pipes and plastic fibre,
  • Artificial: PV powered, non-PV powered.
    The major focus of this study is PV powered artificial sources. There is a small interest in daylight and non-PV powered artificial sources, primarily for reference/benchmarking purposes.

Personnel

DIT - School of Electrical Engineering Systems

Kevin O'Farrell

Dr Eugene Coyle

Prof Brian Norton